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Should I be honest when you ask me if I’m ok?

For the longest time, when someone asks me how I’m doing, I said “fine thanks!” It’s bright, breezy and if we are honest, what most people want to hear.  

Lots of people I know in the real world read this blog, and so when I see them, I think they feel they have to ask after my health. Being British and having the polite factor drummed into me, I respond with the usual answers of “good, how are you?” “Fine, thank you” and “not too bad!”.  

Sometimes I see the confusion in their faces and realise that they’ve probably just read a heart wrenching description of my mental health and that I shat myself that morning. (Oh the joys of being an oversharing Blogger!) 


It’s a worry when you have a chronic illness that you are going to become too much for those around you, that it must be hard that you are always ailing with something.  I worry that people will get bored of me and my illness, that they wish I’d just be better and stop banging on about it! 

I also feel pressure to be sunny and positive, I think sometimes people expect it of me because of writing this blog. I feel I have to be a shiny, happy person and not talk about all the many negatives. 

It got me thinking about why I say “fine” when I’m anything but fine. And I think some of it is embarrassment, some is habit and some is my issue of opening up to people unless it’s in the written word or if I’m standing in front of an audience! Yes, I realise that’s quite fucked up. 

So I thought I would start trying to be honest when I’m asked how I am. The results have varied! Most people seem taken aback when I say “I’m not great to be honest, I’m back and forth to the hospital and it’s really getting me down” I think it shocks them to get a genuine response to an everyday, casual question. 

When this happens I feel a bit embarrassed and that I’m flaunting some unwritten rule that I should have a stiff upper lip, nod and enquirer how they are doing without actually wanting to know the answer. 

But I’ve also had some great responses, from those who are asking because they care. In that fleeting moment where I tell them that I’m struggling and they reach out, touch my shoulder, tell me that they’re there for me if I need anything. Those interactions feel so real and genuine and human. 

So you’ve been warned. I’m going to try and be honest from now on. If you don’t want to know, don’t ask! 
Sam xx 

Working and chronic illness

For the past three years since I started on this whole surgery journey and things took such a toll, I have been self employed. I have been a freelance writer that’s funded the growth of this blog. I’ve also been extremely supported by my husband, both emotionally and financially. As a self employed person, when you don’t work, you don’t get paid, therefore for the 5 surgeries, subsequent recoveries and hospital stays, without the support of Timm, we couldn’t have afforded to live. 

I applied for PIP, asking for support and was flatly refused. The process was so stressful that I couldn’t even bring myself to appeal. It was really difficult, embarrassing and pretty humiliating, so to then get the response that I scored ZERO was heartbreaking.  That’s right, the PIP folk say I have no extra needs than anyone else. I felt like emptying my bag on their desk and asking them what needs they then had…

The fact I have a life long chronic illness meant nothing, the pain, joint problems, fatigue, anxiety, ostomy, dependency on my husband, the raw bleeding skin, ulcers, the leaks, the planning it takes to leave the house, the dietary issues, the exhaustion, the medication, all of it meant nothing and they said I wasn’t entitled to a thing.  This meant money has been tight and till very recently, I just didn’t feel capable of taking on any other work. 

But now I have a new job for Scope as the digital community officer and I LOVE IT! But the reality is that I can only do this job because they support me in working from home.  So how’s it going? Well, I love the job! Working full time is a huge shock to the system and it’s taking its toll on me. 

I finish work and I’m so thoroughly shattered that I’m in bed by 7pm!  On bad days (which has been every day this week) I have used my lunch hour to sleep.  I’m still figuring it all out but I’m sure I will get there. Timm has had to take up a much bigger role in childcare and running the house as I simply can’t do it all. 

It’s a lot to take on but I’m happy I have done it, I almost feel like this job is part of my recovery process. It is helping my self esteem and confidence massively and reducing my feelings of guilt that have plagued me for years of illness where I’ve felt I had to rely almost entirely on Timm. 

Working from home is ideal for me, I couldn’t cope with working in an office. I still have leaks and stoma issues and the privacy of working from home means the embarrassment factor is reduced hugely and the logistics of dealing my bag is so much easier here.  It also means that on a very bad day I don’t need to worry too much about my physical appearance. When I’m struggling, it’s hard enough just to get up in the morning let alone having to make myself presentable for others! 

Emotionally, it’s been a rollercoaster but I’m nearly  a month in and I’m feeling lots more confident.  My anxiety feels more under control and my self esteem is really boosted. After so long of needing my husband to provide for us all, it feels amazing to be a breadwinner! 

This is obviously only my experience, everyone is different and I don’t judge people who don’t or can’t work or work out of the home.  I feel really lucky in finding this opportunity that works for me but I know working from home just isn’t an option for some people. 

So my top tips for working with chronic illness? This is what has worked for me:

Seek out opportunities, they are out there even if they’re few and far between and it might be a struggle. 

Ask for support whilst looking for work. The government website is a good place to start. You could try talking to a Disability Employment Officer

Once you have a job, speak to your employer about your needs.  Whatever your physical or learning disability, you have a right to equality, fairness, respect and understanding at your workplace  under the Equality Act 2010. 

Listen to your body, what does it need? Right now I need rest and comfort and so I have a hot water bottle to hand, plenty of fluids and I do power nap at lunch which sets me up for a great afternoon working. Only you know what you need. 

You can’t do everything.  I did the lions share of housework, but now I work full time, I ask for help from my husband and kids and I got a cleaner. Yes, a cleaner is a luxury, but it is the best £20 a week I spend as it reduces my work load and stress levels. I know it’s not affordable for everyone but I would rather go without other luxuries and use that money for something that really helps me out. 

Prioritise your time. Adding work into your life means other things will fall by the wayside.  Prioritise the important stuff. 

Be open with your employer and let them know your limitations. Offer solutions to the issues you may face and ask for help. 

Rest when you need to. I have fatigue, so I know that when I’m not working, rest is a fuel for my health. 

If you don’t know it, search it. We all have access to all the information in the world! There’s a ton of info and support out there, if you have thought of the question, it’s likely that others have too. Use the internet for research and help. 

If you’re interested in my new role, you can take a look at the Scope Community.  Register and join in on hundreds of posts, questions and comments and a community of disabled people and the families and carers of disabled people now! 
Sam x 

Finding out who your friends are

Chronic illness has a lot of downsides. A LOT!  Apart from the physical effects, the surgeries, the time in hospital and the emotional and mental effects, it can massively effect your social life and friendships. 
I think it really does show who your friends are though.  I get that my illness has gone on for a long time, I know this more than anyone. I know it must be hard to be friends with me at times, I’m not the worlds most reliable person after all. I cancel on plans at the last minute and there’s times where I am so unwell that I can’t be there for the people I care about. 

But it makes me really sad that there are friends who sometimes seem to forget about me.  Maybe they are fair weather friends, only there when I have something to give back, only there when I am able to be fun and go out.  Or maybe they just don’t know what to say to me? 

I know it’s not just me too. I get a lot of messages from readers who are facing the same thing and are unsure of how to deal with it which is why I decided to write this post.  I don’t want to sound self obsessed or bitchy but it is definitely an issue for people with long term health conditions. 

Scope did a poll where they found that two thirds of people feel awkward around disability. Perhaps the same applies to illness?  Maybe people are worried about the right or wrong thing to say? Maybe they’re concerned about offending? 

I understand that feeling of being scared to say the wrong thing. Of worrying about sticking your foot in it and saying something that may upset the other person. But dude, just do it. Send a message, pick up the phone, arrange a visit. 

I try to see the best in others, I think it’s better to assume the best in people rather than thinking the worst and so I try and think of reasons behind this behaviour.  Perhaps they’re just really busy, they have their own shit to be dealing with.  It’s easy to slip your mind when your life and struggles take over.  Maybe they don’t know what to say or they are having their own issues? 

I have some amazing friends who I couldn’t cope without, who are always there for me.  They put themselves out to come and look after me, cook and clean when I can’t.  They visit, call and text and those people I am truly grateful to. 

I know it’s tough being my friend.  I know there are these vast time periods when I am so ill that I can give you nothing back. Believe me when I tell you how sorry I am that there are times when our friendship is one way, I’m sorry that sometimes I need more than I can give.  But know that as broken as I may be, I am loyal and loving and kind and when my stupid, bloody illness allows, I will be there for you too. 

Sam xx 

Please don’t stop inviting me

When you have a chronic illness, one of the things that cause guilt and stress is letting people down, I hate that I am sometimes so slack and have to say no to plans, often at the last minute.  To anyone I let down, I am sorry.

But please don’t stop inviting me…

I know it is frustrating when I call (or more likely do the cowardly text) at the last minute, I am sure you look down at your phone and roll your eyes and think ‘here we go again!’ I am sorry that I cancel on our plans, but I swear, in the cheesiest of lines, it’s not you, it’s me.

Whether it is last minute pain, fatigue or anxiety, whether it is physical or mental, I know that it can seem to you that I must not care.  I know that you may analyse my excuse and logically come up with an outcome where I could make it if I really wanted to.   I know that it makes you sad, or angry, or fed up.

But please don’t stop inviting me.

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I know you have been there for me and come to my events, my parties, my coffee breaks.  You make the effort to visit me and be an amazing friend.  You put yourself out and very rarely cancel and it must be so frustrating to have a friend who doesn’t return the favour.

It must be quite difficult having me as a friend, I don’t have a normal level of consistency in my life, it is one thing or another with my health and if it isn’t a physical thing, years of living with these issues have made me mad as a bag of frogs.

But please don’t stop inviting me.

I am sorry for that time I missed your child’s birthday party, I am sorry I didn’t come on your planned trek to the countryside, I am sorry I bailed on your last party, I am sorry I cancelled our brunch date, I apologise for saying I would definitely come to that yoga class with you then abandoning you to do it alone.

I feel terrible that I didn’t call you more regularly when my problems seem to fill my whole head space, it makes me sad to know that I am not the best friend in the world, I’m sorry I wasn’t there for you.

But please don’t stop inviting me.

I know I am sometimes slack and I cancel on you.  This illness of mine sometimes makes me selfish and clouds out everything else, but know this.  I may not be present, but you are always in my thoughts, I might miss your event but I love you dearly, I bailed on your party but I am loyal, caring and my friends mean everything to me.

Even when I don’t make it to your events, please know how much it means to be invited.  Your offers mean everything even if I know I can’t make it.  Thank you for making me feel normal, for not being put off by my illness, my cancelations, my issues.

Please don’t stop inviting me.

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It takes a very special person to be friends with someone with a chronic, life long illness.  You lose friends and family members along the way when you are ill, it is a time where you find out who is really there for you.  Some people can’t hack it, they walk away and don’t want to be part of your life because it isn’t all sweetness and light.  These fair-weather friends are only there for the good times, when the shit hits the bedpan, they are out of here!!!

But the people who stay are true gems, and I appreciate the friends and family who have stuck by my side throughout the terrible lows and been there to cheer for the amazing highs.

Thank you to my amazing friends.

Thank you for never stopping inviting me.

 

Sam xxx

Things I’d like you to know from a sick person

1. I don’t need your sympathy but I do need your understanding.

2. Don’t be embarrassed. If you have a question, just ask!

3. It’s not you, it’s me. Please be patient when I can’t make events/cancel last minute/don’t return your calls.

4. Needing help and support is not easy to ask for, but know I appreciate every offer.

5. Don’t be afraid. Sometimes my treatment is scary and unknown to you. It’s ok to not know what I’m going through.

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6. Don’t be a stranger! Visits, texts, phone calls are all welcome.

7. Your children’s questions and comments are great. Don’t shush them when they point and ask, kids don’t bullshit.

8. Sometimes I don’t want to talk about it. Don’t be offended if I answer quickly and then change the subject.

9. Sometimes I do want to talk about it. Sorry if I bore your ear off with a rant. I don’t need answers, I just need to vent.

10. Sometimes it takes the strength and stamina of a mountain climber to just do the things that come normally to you.

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11. Hospitals hate flowers. But I don’t! If you want to send me them, wait till I’m home.  Then I’ll cherish them.

12. I appreciate that being my friend/partner/colleague is sometimes a bit tough. Thank you for being part of my life.

13. Sometimes I feel really sorry for myself and my head is in a whirl. Sorry for the times I hide away.

14. When you send me links to things about my illness, it means a lot to know you’re trying to understand and help.

15. It’s not all about me! Please don’t worry that your struggles aren’t “as bad” as mine. I want to know what you’re going through and help when I can.

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16. Sometimes my meds make me fat/thin/sleepy/manic/sad/weird/angry. Don’t worry.

17. I have good days and bad. Often my good days lead to bad days because I push myself too hard so I get to do nice things.

18. I’m sometimes a bad friend because I lock myself away and I’m not there for you. I’m sorry.

19. My husband and kids are going through this too. Don’t forget them. (Timm always accepts trips to the pub)

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20. This is a lifelong thing with no cure. If you can’t take the heat, get the fuck out of my kitchen.

 

Sam xx

Medical ID app

I found out about this app on the iPhone recently and thought it would be of interest to you all. 

It’s called Medical ID and allows access to some vital information on your phone in an emergency situation. It’s free, simple and easy to set up and so I thought I’d talk you through the set up process. 

Go to the Health app on your iPhone.   

medical id app apps to help with disability Go to Medical ID in the bottom right hand corner.   

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Click on that and fill in your information starting with name and date of birth and medical conditions as well as medical notes.  As I have a jpouch, I added in a note explaining that rectal exams must be taken with extreme care. 

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You can then add your emergency contacts (you can add more than one), blood type and if you are a donor. 

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Then save the information and it can be found if necessary on your locked screen by pressing emergency and then Medical ID. 

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It takes a couple of minutes but allows you a little piece of mind that in an emergency, your medical needs are right there for the people who may need them. 

Hope this helps! 
Sam x 

  

10 GREAT things about life with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

We all know that life with any chronic, lifelong illness sucks,  when that illness is Inflammatory Bowel Disease in the form of Ulcerative Colitis or Crohn’s Disease, it is shitty! (Pun definitely intended).  I am as guilty as everyone else in writing about all the negative aspects of this, I have spent two years doing just that, but I thought it time to write about the great things…

 

1. Regular new underwear.  Well, when you end up abandoning pants in sanitary bins because you shit yourself, you have to replenish the stock! Make it some nice ones.

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2. You know more about the workings of the digestive system than most people.  Including doctors.

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3. You sound like you’re carrying maracas in your bag due to all the meds rattling around.  Make the most of it and shimmy as you walk.

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4.  You become the Poo Oracle of all your friends.  Revel in the power of knowing about all your mates poo stories.

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5. You know your way around your local hospital and so never get lost.  You have been in most wards at some point, you could draw a map!

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6. You have an excellent excuse to eat crap, beige food when you are in the mood.  Yes, you need a mcdonalds, everything in there is on the low residue diet!

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7. You have a sense of humour.  Sometimes sick, sometimes inappropriate but when you have been through so much, you have to learn to laugh or you would cry.

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8. People get so used to you looking rough that when you are well and scrub up, you look amazing and people comment.

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9. You have the ability to teach those around you.  About illness, invisible disability, compassion, love and positivity.  Use it.

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10. You know that life is precious.  You have been through hell and are still standing! You know that no matter how tough life is, it is ALWAYS better than the alternative.

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Sam x

 

Going Dark

I’m not feeling too great at the minute.  Still.  My joints hurt so much, my wrists, hands, ankles, shoulders, hips… the pain is like a gnawing ache, and it moves around, floats from place to place in my body.  Isn’t that odd?

The tiredness is terrible.  I can’t wake in the mornings and then fall asleep all day, it’s the fatigue that is so hard to deal with.  The exhaustion makes me feel useless and like a sick person, it sucks out all energy, not just physically but mentally and emotionally.

I saw my GP this week and had some blood tests.  He suggested it could be a flare up of Ulcerative Colitis.  Isn’t that a joke! I thought removing my colon got rid of this bullshit but it turns out it’s all these ‘extra intestinal manifestations’ (I know this sounds like a ghostly poo but it means when the disease affects other parts of the body).

My eyes are so dry that I can’t open them in the mornings and they itch all day, my mouth is constantly dry no matter how much I drink.  My skin is dry, my legs are white with the skin coming away.

I’m going back next week for the results, if my inflammation markers are up then I potentially will have to have a course of steroids and go back under the gastro team at the hospital.  He also tested for Rheumatoid Arthritis to see if that is what is hurting my joints and so I just need to wait and see what he says on Wednesday.

Im not a great person to be around right now.  I don’t want to talk to people, I don’t want to go out.  I make myself do the things I have to do, but really want to just be hiding in the duvet cocoon.  The problem is because I talk so much normally (read: I’m a gobby cow), that when I feel hurt and sad, I go quiet and this worries those closest to me.  There’s a phrase on that TV series 24 when an agent turns off communications usually for their own safety or for the safety of those around them, it’s called ‘going dark’.

Going Dark: When an individual disappears or suddenly become unavailable or out of reach for an undefined period of time, generally for security reasons.

This describes me right now.  The only place I can deal with sharing at the moment is on my blog.  I know this can seem difficult for my husband and friends but it is all I have at the minute.

I feel so sad.  I thought all these surgeries would make me feel better (and I have to keep reminding myself that I AM better than I was) but it is hard to still be a sick person.  It’s silly because I always knew there was no cure for Ulcerative Colitis and that it is a life long chronic illness, an auto-immune disease that means my body is fighting itself.  But after everything I have been through, I just want a break.  I don’t want to be fucking ill anymore. I bloody hate being a poorly person.  I despise the burden I become to those around me.  I can’t stand that my lovely boy, the best person in my life, my husband Timm has to, yet again, bear the weight of my illness.

I’m sorry this post is so miserable.  I sometimes feel that I made a rod for my own back in being so god damned positive all the time!!! I feel I am letting people down when I feel sad.  But in a way, it helps.  I’m reading back all that advise that I give to others and remembering that I need to take it myself.

And so with that, I am going to try and treat myself a little better, sit in the sun, paint my nails, read a book.  Do the tiny things that I can manage that will ease my mind and warm my soul.

Thanks for reading

 

Sam x

 

What a week!!

So, this week has been crazy!! After my post of the letter to the woman who tutted at me for using the disabled toilets went viral, the website has had over 2 million views and I have been in newspapers, websites, radio stations around the world and even had an appearance on BBC breakfast.

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I have been on BBC Sheffield, BBC WM, BBC 5 live, Spin 1038, Rother FM and Hallam FM.

I made it over to Australia and appeared on both The Telegraph and News.com as well as countless smaller news outlets.

Lots of Danish and Swedish websites ran the story too. Plus too many sites than I can mention have shared, reblogged and discussed the story as well as the Metro and Huffington Post.

I have been in the Sheffield Star, daily Mail and the Mirror.

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But please don’t think I’m bragging. I am just so pleased that my story, my little blog, my baby has made it into the lives of so many people.

From the start, what I wanted was to make a difference. To help those with Crohns and Colitis to not feel alone, to know there are others who feel the same, suffer in a similar way and that there are a community of people who care and want to make their lives better.

To know I’m part of that, that I’ve made people feel a little better is amazing. I am so proud.

Now, pride is a sin, (I remember this from my Catholic youth!) but I don’t care! I am proud that I have turned the worst two years of my life into something amazingly positive, something that has made a difference to people around the world!

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I have received messages from thousands of people telling me their stories. I am honoured that all these people feel they can share the personal details of their illnesses and feelings. I am reading every single comment and email and trying to reply to as many as I can.

I’m in shock to be honest, the past week has sent me from a blogger sat talking about poo in her office to the couch of the UK’s top breakfast show! I am a little overwhelmed by the attention but so blessed that this has happened.

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I just want to thank every one of you. Every single read, like and share is making a difference to millions of people. This issue is bigger than the IBD audience that I had originally planned it for. Messages from people with all manner of invisible disabilities have touch and I have learnt a LOT.

Moving forward from this viral publicity, I am more motivated than ever to make a difference. I am in talks with three different charities about how I can help to better the lives of my peers and I am so excited.

I know I come across as this confident, outspoken person who is fearless… Inside I am a 33 year old mum, I am a wife, sister, daughter, friend. I was a teenage mum and constantly worry and question myself. I have a chronic illness that will never leave me and I’m always exhausted. I worry people will judge me on my lack of further education and think I’m stupid. I’m a size 16 woman living in a world where women are judged my their size not their character.

But I’m also a writer.

I want to make a difference.

I want to change the world.

And so this past week has taken me, and all my flaws and weaknesses, and taken me one step closer to my goals.

Thank you so much. You’ll never know how much I appreciate every read, every like, every share, every comment.

You lot are awesome.

Thank you

✌️& ❤️

Sam xx

More Than Meets The Eye – Campaign for Invisible Disabilities Awareness

After my post on using accessible toilets with an invisible disability went viral with over 2 million views, I knew I had to harness this amazing audience and do something good with it and so after spending the week talking to people with disabilities all over the world and also Disability Charity Scope, I am over the moon to launch More Than Meets The Eye, a campaign for invisible disability awareness.

In the open letter to the woman who judged me for using accessible toilets, I wrote “I know you saw me running in, with my able bodied legs and all. You saw me opening the door with my two working arms. Without any visible sign of disability.  My lack of wheelchair may have suggested to you that I was some lazy cow who didn’t care. You may have seen my face blushing as I caught your eye and assumed I was showing guilt at blagging the disabled loos. You tutted loudly.”

I’ve received THOUSANDS of messages from readers who have faced similar judgement from members of the public because of their own invisible disability. People with cancer, prosthetic limbs, autism, Tourette’s, brain disorders, bladder issues, partners with dementia and so many other issues… All saying the same thing.

That there is more to them than meets the eye. Their disabilities may not be visible at a glance but they are so real and they make their lives difficult at times.  That not every disability requires a wheelchair and that using an accessible toilet or disabled parking space isn’t a luxury or a privilege, it is a necessity for them to lead their lives.

I have learnt so much from the people who have contacted me, I had a chat with amazing charity Scope and they agree that more needs to be done to raise awareness of invisible disabilities…

And so begins this campaign… #MoreThanMeetsTheEye is my way of making a stand for all the people who contacted me and for the millions around the world who live every day with an illness or disability that affects their lives but is unseen by others.

People with an invisible disability don’t want special treatment, but for society to be more aware that they exist, for everyone to think twice before judging someone who looks seemingly able bodies, and to be more compassionate and kinder to their fellow human.  More Than Meets The Eye is a way to bring the discussion of Invisible Disabilities into the lives of everyone.  To share real stories and explain how it is to live with an illness or disability that can’t easily be seen.

No one expects for the public to know about every single disability and illness but rather than immediately judging someone you see using accessible toilets or disabled parking, stop and remember there is a human being on front of you who may have many different issues that they shouldn’t have to explain to you.

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I am sharing with you some messages I have received from readers of So Bad Ass. Please join me in sharing your own stories using #MoreThanMeetsTheEye or perhaps you can take a photograph naming your invisible disability or how you feel?

I will be doing a bit of blogging and writing for Scope in the coming weeks and really hope to raise their profile as they do a fantastic job at supporting people with disabilities as well as educating, raising awareness and working hard for equality.

This is an issue for millions, so many people are sharing their own stories of being judged, but I genuinely don’t think that all the ones doing the judging are nasty or mean people!  I think they believe they are defending the rights of those who they think are entitled to use accessible toilets or disabled parking spaces.  I have had so many telling me that they have been the person tutting but it is because they see someone seemingly able bodied and think they are helping.

The reality is that there are so many reasons why people need extra support and we all need to be more aware that invisible disabilities exist on so many levels and that judgment just makes lives more difficult.

Please take a look through some of the images below and take the time to read real quotes on how it feels to be judged for something that is beyond your control.   The first one is from an email I received from a mum talking about her little girl.

“She was born at 26 weeks and had to have part of her bowel removed.  We use disabled toilets and the disgusting glares and tuts we get are unreal.  I refuse to explain my daughter’s complex health issues with strangers so they usually waltz off believing they’ve put the world to rights.  In actual fact they’ve just made a disable little girl and her family much more anxious about going out.”

Read that and remember it the next time you see someone seemingly able bodied using an accessible toilet and think you are helping by telling them off…

Take a look through these quotes and I hope they will make a difference to the attitudes of society, I would love to see these printed in and around accessible toilet areas! Together we can make people realise that there is #MoreThanMeetsTheEye

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For every person with an illness or disability that can’t be seen immediately, I want a brighter future, a happier future and a kinder and more compassionate future.

Please share and get involved, I am so overwhelmed at the viral attention and think we have got people talking, but we can go further with #MoreThanMeetsTheEye and actually make a difference worldwide!

You can share your own stories of Invisible Disability using #MoreThanMeetsTheEye on Facebook, twitter and instagram or share them with me through my contact page and I will display them on the More Than Meets The Eye Page here on So Bad Ass and on all my social media.

You can find me on twitter @so_bad_ass, Facebook and Instagram.

Let’s make a change and get people talking.

✌️& ❤️

Sam x

 

You can contact Scope on their website or by phone on 0808 800 3333 or email at ku.gr1498708590o.epo1498708590cs@en1498708590ilple1498708590h1498708590