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World Ostomy Day

Today is World Ostomy Day! This is like my poo lady Christmas!

When I had my surgery, I never thought I would be celebrating my Ostomy but as I have learnt to accept my illness, I can recognise that my Ostomy was the start of a new life for me. It is a different life to the one I imagined but my ostomy has had so many positive effects on my life.


Writing about ostomies, jpouches, IBD and invisible disabilities is an honour and a privilege and I have heard so many stories both of struggle and of overcoming adversity.


Today lets celebrate our ostomies whether we still have them or not!  I now have a jpouch and so no longer have my ostomy but I loved my stoma that helped my body come through ulcerative colitis.


Having your body change so massively can be a huge challenge, both physically, emotionally and mentally.  It can be a very isolating experience and so talking out about life with an Ostomy is so important to help others.  I speak out in the hope that people following in my path will have a slightly easier time.


If you need support or help, here are a list of amazing people that I would highly recommend.

Colostomy Association

IA Support

Crohns and Colitis UK

Feel free to share my World Ostomy Day images with links to www.sobadass.me or make your own pictures to share and celebrate!

 

Sam x

Why you should go to support groups

I do quite a bit of public speaking about life with IBD, stomas, jpouches and also self esteem and body confidence. I also volunteer with Crohns and Colitis UK and IA Support at events all over the UK.  And the one thing that tends to be the same at these events is the lack of younger people attending and I think it is a real shame.

I understand that there is so much support online nowadays, and I also get that going to a support event in person can be a terrifying experience, but I do believe that person to person support, that real life connection is irreplaceable by chatting online.

When I had my first surgery and had my ostomy, it was suggested that I attended a Stoma Open Day at the local hospital to meet other local ostomates and see all the different products available to me.  I went along and entered the room, so nervous that I was shaking.  I nearly turned back a few times, the idea of going into a room of strangers was almost too much to bear.

stoma ostomy ileostomy colostomy ibd ulcerative colitis photo shoot

I think I was the youngest person there by 20 years.  That sucked.

As I walked around the stalls I was asked twice who I was with, the assumption being that I was there to support an older relative.  It really dented my confidence and reasserted this awful feeling that I had an “old persons disease”.

It made me realise that it is a vicious circle.  A younger person attends these events and feels out of place and so doesn’t return, meaning the next younger person who arrives feels exactly the same.

This is why I feel the need to speak out, make a call to arms, to ask all you younger folk (and by younger I mean under 50!) to try out an event local to you.  It isn’t easy but I assure you that having attended many over the past two years, the feeling I walk away with after spending time with people who know exactly how you feel, after talking openly to people about things you may shy away from with your friends and family, that feeling is good.  It’s inclusive, it’s helpful.

That feeling I had at the first event made me want to make things better for others.  This blog, my talks, the things I discuss in the media is all part of a plan to raise awareness and make people be more understanding that chronic illness can strike at any age and that we need more support for all.

I will be at the Stoma Day this year as a volunteer for Crohns and Colitis UK South Yorkshire group, so if you are in the area, please come along, you are guaranteed to see at least one smily face and I would love to chat and help you make other connections.  It is terribly advertised and so you may not even be aware of it.

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It is on 5th October 2015 from 10am – 3pm at Hillsborough Arena in Sheffield and is organised by Sheffield Hospitals.  If you have an ostomy and live in South Yorkshire, do consider coming along.

As I said I volunteer for the South Yorkshire group of Crohns and Colitis UK, we are a team of volunteers who offer support to sufferers and their families, do fundraising and generally getting the name of CCUK out there, especially in South Yorkshire. The team can take up as little or as much time as you’re able to, we’re grateful for any help. So if you feel like coming along, even just to see what we’re about, then we’d love to see you.  We are having a meeting this Thursday 17th September in Sheffield, all are welcome if you are interested in helping out or hearing more.  You can find the event here.  We are ever so friendly and we are a laid back group so please think about getting involved.

I do a lot of this stuff because I really do care, I want to make a difference.  I honestly believe that through speaking out and talking at events, we can help all others who follow in our path.  What we go through as people with IBD is tough, we fight an illness that tries to ruin every part of our lives and the worst thing is the strangling silence that wraps itself around our throats and stops us speaking out.  Meeting others who are going through the same thing makes life a little easier, it stops that feeling of isolation, of feeling of being alone.

So think about it, have a look at local events to you and consider attending just one.  If we all do that, imagine the army of support we could create!

Helping others and helping yourself.  Get involved.

 

Sam xxx

Coloplast Care

The folk at Coloplast have developed a new support programme for people with an ostomy called Coloplast Care which is a fantastic idea and great development for ostomates everywhere.
Whether you are facing surgery, a new ostomate or had your ostomy for years, Coloplast know that each person is totally unique and therefore their needs for support are so different.  The great thing about Coloplast Care is that it is a bespoke and individual plan that aims to help in everything from the basic medical principles of an ostomy to the practical things you can expect as time goes on.  Offering information and support both physically and emotionally and giving you back a level of control to empower you in your new life.
I would have loved to have had this programme two years ago when I was facing surgery and think it is amazing how much ostomy support is moving on.  I remember the feelings of isolation, confusion and upset and just not having all the information.  Though my doctors and stoma nurse were wonderful, the questions I had always popped into my head at 3 am meaning I would find myself frantically googling away to figure out what I could do and sometimes felt very alone in the vast internet world of differing opinions.
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Whatever stage you are at, from complete newbie novice to old pro, we all still have questions, no matter how ‘sorted’ you are, a new situation can always pop up and create distress in not knowing how to handle it.  Coloplast Care advisors are there to guide you through stoma routines, ostomy accessories, check ups and so much more.

It’s not just for people who use Coloplast products; it’s open to anyone so do go take a look no matter which products you currently use.  It provides specific support and advice to each member based on your needs, whether your issues are emotional or if you have just had surgery, or perhaps you have had your stoma for 5 years but you are off travelling and need some advice, the programme tailors advice and support for the problems you are having right now.

So how do you join?

coloplast care ostomy support

It’s quick and simple, head over to the sign up page, fill in your name, email address and what sort of surgery you have had (or are expecting).

On the ‘Experience’ page, you are asked about any issues you may have with adhesion problems, skin irritation or pouch problems.

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The “Wellbeing’ page questions how you are feeling, with more in depth questions about your support, worries and emotional wellbeing.

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And that is the basic sign up done!  You can then go on to answer more questions about yourself and your situation if you like.  I would recommend this as they more information they have, the better and more useful support you can receive.  This includes more about you, how you live, your age, hobbies, activity levels and then information regarding your current ostomy products, shape and size of your stoma, position, how your body and skin is.  All this data is used to tailor your programme to you.

If you struggle with technology or are unsure on how to work the forms, do ask a friend, family member or a health professional to guide you through.  But it is very clear and simple to use.

The company’s ethos is to ‘listen and respond’ and so the website is chock full of advice sheets, support guides and problem solving information. It also includes a system to help ostomates identify problems that they’re having for example skin irritation, pancaking etc.  This means you can print off and discuss these issues with your stoma nurse, or request a call-back from an advisor, as well as the programme recommending some products to try and resolve these problems.  This isn’t to replace the advice from your doctors and stoma nurses but additional support that gives you the power to be informed and proactive.

It can be quite overwhelming when you see the amount of choice when it comes to ostomy bags and accessories, so to have a programme that goes through your needs and then shows you options is fantastic. You can also order free samples through the site to try out before committing to a new bag.

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Another part that is just great is the Ostomy Check, around 40% of people with a stoma have an issue that they are just putting up with, that they think is something they just have to live with.  The Ostomy Check is there for people to see what is ‘normal’ and what is an issue that they could do something about.  Coloplast support staff will send an email asking them to complete a checklist every couple of months.  I think this is a fantastic service that is patient centred, it is nice to feel cared for and sometimes after you have left hospital, you can feel isolated and not sure where to turn for support and advice.

I have met a lot of ostomates who have told me of issues, from slight niggles to huge problems, that they believed where part and parcel of life with a stoma.  This service allows people to see exactly what can be done to help and support them.  One person noticing an issue and recommending a product could change a person’s life!

As with everything, your stoma and ostomy needs change over time and the brilliant thing about Coloplast Care is that is adapts and changes with you.  This isn’t about a one size fits all support as that just doesnt work! The programme adapts and grows with your needs, tailoring advice to what you need, when you need it.

I have spoken to a few ostomates using the Coloplast Care programme and all have found it helpful, many saying they wished this was around when they first got their stomas.  I think we need to empower and educate ourselves about our health and this system helps you do that.

Head over to Coloplast now and check it out, it’s free, easy and if you don’t like it, you can opt out no problems!

 

 

Sam xx

 

This is a sponsored review, meaning that representatives of Coloplast Care have paid me for this post, but it is my own, honest opinions.  From time to time, So Bad Ass reviews products and services for companies, but I only share things that I believe benefit my amazing readers.

Pelican Live Your Life Roadshow – Preston

I will be talking at the Pelican Live Your Life roadshow in Preston on Sunday 5th July talking ostomies and body image.

At Bartle Hall from 11-3, Come along and meet the Pelican team, chat to nurses, and attend some great talks. It’s a must for people with an ostomy, carers, family and friends. I’ll be doing my talk once in the morning and once in the afternoon so if you’re near Preston, do call in.

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Feel free to drop by with your family and friends, anytime between 11am and 3pm. If you have any queries, or would like to confirm your attendance, you can contact:

Email – ku.oc1574080774.erac1574080774htlae1574080774hnaci1574080774lep@g1574080774nitek1574080774ram1574080774
Freephone – 0800 318 282

The guys at Pelican are super friendly and so easy to talk to, it’s well worth getting in touch.

Sam x

Lift Plus 360 – ostomy adhesive remover review

So those clever chickens over at Opus Healthcare have come up with this new product Lift Plus 360, a medical adhesive remover for people with ostomies.

When I had my stoma I always used an adhesive remover as taking the bags off were the trickiest part, that super great seal you yearn for when putting the bag on to ensure there are no leaks suddenly becomes a huge chore when you have to take the bag off, especially if you use extra flange extenders or those stoma donuts.  The adhesive removers act to pretty instantly stop the sticky.

It can be painful and really affect the skin around the stoma to pull the bags away and so I always recommend a good remover.

Now the Lift Plus 360 goes one step further, the new spray can be applied from any angle (hence the 360° name) meaning it is SO much easier to use.

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I no longer have a stoma and so I called on my lovely pal who has a permanent stoma to try out Lift Plus 360 and let me know what he thought.

“It really does work!” he said “whatever angle you spray it from, you get a great steady stream that is directed exactly where you need it.”

“The worst part of a bag change is pulling the sticky side away from your skin, especially if you’re a bloke who has hair on the stomach area.  With some sprays it doesn’t take all the adhesive off and I end up pulling my hair out, with Lift Plus 360 it was a breeze!”

Adhesive removers have been around for a while, but Opus have redesigned this to make it more user friendly.

Opus say:

Opus Healthcare, a division of Alliance Pharmaceuticals Ltd, has launched Lift Plus 360, the latest range of non-sting adhesive remover. Using the latest bag on valve technology, Lift Plus 360 is a highly effective range of medical adhesive removers that reduce the pain associated with the removal of stoma pouch adhesives. The new spray can be applied from any angle (360°) offering greater efficiency for the user and comes in two varieties.

The new range is an upgrade from Opus’s previous product, the Lift Plus. By removing the propellant to create Lift Plus 360, the product is no longer cold on the skin. It is also more environmentally friendly as the removal ensures less wastage due to greater product emptying.

Other benefits of using Lift Plus 360 include:

  • Reducing the pain associated with removing pouches and flanges
  • It will not irritate sore or broken skin
  • Dries instantly and no need to wash the skin
  • The spray can be applied from any angle (360 degrees), offering greater reliability.
  • The removal of the hydrocarbon propellant ensures:
    • The product is not cold on the skin
    • There’s more product in the can
    • Less wastage due to greater product emptying
    • It’s more environmentally friendly

To order a sample call 0800 458 7605 or for more information take a peek at the Opus website.

The site also has some great ostomy information so is well worth a look.

Sam x

This post was sponsored by representatives of Opus Healthcare.  I do a few paid reviews on this site but ONLY choose products and companies that I believe are a good fit for my awesome So Bad Ass readers and will always disclose when posts are sponsored.

Pelican Healthcare Live Your Life roadshow – Birmingham

I’m thrilled to let you know that I will be at the Pelican Healthcare Live Your Life roadshow this Saturday in Birmingham.

From 10.00 until 3.00pm at Millichip Suite, West Bromwich Albion Football Club

The Hawthorns, West Bromwich, West Midlands, B71 4LF

I will be doing a talk in the morning and afternoon about self esteem, body confidence and ostomies.

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There will be tons of support and information and other interesting talks through the day.
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Feel free to drop by with your family and friends, anytime between 10am and 3pm. If you have any queries, or would like to confirm your attendance, you can contact us by:

Email – ku.oc1574080774.erac1574080774htlae1574080774hnaci1574080774lep@g1574080774nitek1574080774ram1574080774

Freephone – 0800 318 282

Register now to receive a free goody bag on entry!

I look forward to seeing you there! If you live too far away do check out the Pelican website for details of other roadshows.

Sam

#stomaselfie – going viral again!

I am very proud of the photographs I had done with my stoma and ileostomy bag and last week, they went viral!  Appearing in the Metro, Daily Mirror, BT online and The Independent as well as media outlets around the world including lots in Scandinavia, my photos went a little crazy under the hashtag #stomaselfie.

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The purpose of the photographs were to lift the veil, so to speak, on what is under the ileostomy bag.  When I was in hospital before my surgery to remove my colon, I googled images of stomas and I was horrified, all the images were very medical, many stomas that were having issues with prolapse or infection and my fear was intensified.

What I wanted was to show stomas in a way I hadn’t seen before.  To show that my stoma didn’t remove me of my femininity, sexuality or who I was.  I wanted to show the world that it was nothing to be ashamed of, that I was proud of my ostomy and that it really wasn’t as terrifying as I had once imagined.

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I have received many messages of support of these photos, telling me that I am helping to reduce the taboo and stigma.  For that I am very proud and though I was afraid to first show these, I am happy to know that by sharing the images, that I am making a positive impact to the lives of those with stomas.

I know it is a little controversial and some people don’t think I should be showing my stoma, some think it is akin to photographing your bum hole and so it is inappropriate.  Some think it is just a little gross… But the truth is that millions of people worldwide live with a stoma, and if me showing these photographs help just a few of them, then I am happy.

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Unfortunately, some media outlets have got the information wrong and say I have crohns, a colostomy and that these images were inspired by Bethany Townsend’s bikini shots, the truth is I have Ulcerative Colitis, I HAD an ileostomy (I now have a jpouch) and these shots were taken and shared in October 2013 well before the shots of others with ostomy bags went viral!

Thank you to the Metro, Daily Mirror, BT.com and especially The Independent for sharing the photos and spreading awareness, pride and support for people with ostomies around the world!

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Unfortunately, there have been some nasty comments, but I know that putting yourself out there with images like this will always divide opinion.  I know that showing my stoma will bring out the worst in some, but it is so important to share to try and change the opinions of those who think it is “disgusting”.  I receive thousands of amazing comments filled with lovely words and I know I make a difference.  I don’t do this to get attention or for likes on Facebook!! Hahaha!!! I do it to make a difference and I believe that I do.

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Nice, huh? But then you get comments like this that make it all ok…  

“Certainly brave, and since the photos have popped up online I’ve shown my son – 4 years old why he has such a large scar across his tummy and what used to be there. It’s not something I’d ever Google to show him, but because it had popped up I thought it would be helpful for him to see and understand why it’s there”

“The whole point of these photos is to empower and take away any found shame about having a stoma! People will never ever feel the depth of pained shame to having a stoma and just how much it affects people’s lives and how it affects confidence in relationships and families. Complaining about such fickle things as people’s levels of decency is, to me, insulting! … and above all ignorant!”

“a stoma is like having an artificial leg you would never turn round to someone on the beach and say eeww put that away…I’ve not long had mine and at the start I was devastated as I had always been aware of my figure but my stoma saved my life and when anyone says anything negative about it…I just think I had hours to live and that was my only option…it saved my life”

“Amazing wonderful beautiful strong brave are just a handful of words I would use for these people. Much more than I ever will be! Some of the comments on here are just disgusting, but I dont expect anything less from uneducated morons who havent got a slightest clue on what a “real” issue really is! The models in these photos are heroes in my eyes!”

You can see more of my shoots here, here, here and here.  All photos are by Timm Cleasby at The Picture Foundry and are copywrited, please don’t use my photos without permission as it makes us a bit sad.  Get in touch and we can discuss usage terms.

 

Love Sam x

 

Give someone a #BagofLife

Which would you choose?

colostomy association bag of life

The Colostomy Association are launching a crowdfunding campaign for Stoma Aid.  You can change the lives of thousands of people with a stoma across the world by helping spread the word about Stoma Aid by pledging a Facebook post or Tweet in our Thunderclap campaign.

Millions of people worldwide have a stoma – where an opening has been made on their abdomen which allows waste to pass out of their body. For these people, a stoma bag is necessary to securely, conveniently and safely collect output from their stoma.

However, thousands of people with a stoma across the world are forced to use tin cans, carrier bags and bits of cloth because they are unable to afford the cost of a stoma bag. In Papua New Guinea there are only two stoma care nurses in the entire country; in the Philippines a single bag costs a week’s wages.

For people with a stoma in developing countries, infection and hernias are extremely common as a result of them having to use tin cans and carrier bags. Many people are left unable to work or leave their home because of embarrassment and medical complications.

Each month, tens of thousands of stoma bags are thrown away in the UK as they are no longer needed. We will collect these unused bags and distribute them to people in need in developing countries across the world.

It will only take £22,000 to change the lives of thousands of people across the world. Help us spread the word about Stoma Aid and give someone a #BagOfLife.

Please get involved.

The last two years have been so hard, yet I am lucky enough to live in the UK and the NHS has supported me fully both with the actual surgeries but also with a constant free supply of ileostomy bags and a trained stoma nurse on call.  Sometimes I wonder how different my life would be if I lived in a country where I had to pay for my treatment and supplies.  But then I cannot even IMAGINE how it would be to have no access to ostomy bags, to live in a country where I had to make do with bags, plastic, cans or bottles.

It is heartbreaking to think about the people who are dealing with this every day.  To lose your bowel and have to have an ostomy is tough enough, but to then deal with feeling dirty, smelly and humiliated and have to create a bag out of rubbish is unbelievable.

Please pledge a Facebook message and a tweet.  It takes two minutes and means on 1st May when this campaign launches, it will do so with a huge boost on social media.

 

Thank you

Sam xx

2014 – what a year!

What a year! I started 2014 in Sydney with my sister and our families, we travelled up the coast and had an epic road trip.  It has also brought me a hernia, a house move, surgery to create my jpouch, a couple of weeks in hospital, a new life learning to live without my colon or ileostomy bag and one more hernia!

I have been on the radio a few times, done talks all over the UK, hit my 100K views on So Bad Ass (now up to 160K) and started a writing course.  I also visited my aunty and uncle in Spain and honeymooned in Lanzarote with Timm  I made a new friend who has a stoma… we made friends because we have no colons but stayed friends because we are awesome and he makes me laugh in a rather unladylike fashion and knows, like really knows…  I made new friends without stomas who I now feel like I have known forever and I hung out with so many old friends who made every tough part of my year easier and every lovely part of my year happier.

We bought a hot tub, I got a big tattoo, I met Chuck D and Flavor Flav, went on a nudist beach and my sister came over to the UK to visit with her family.

I renewed my wedding vows to the best husband in the whole world in the BEST WEDDING EVER surrounded by all my absolute favourite people and married by one of my best friends Violet.

2014 has had it’s ups and downs.  The wedding was amazing, it was just the most beautiful and perfect day and to get to marry my perfect bloke for the second time was the best thing ever and my total highlight of the year.

The surgery was tough, 10 days in hospital after a long, difficult surgery and now 7 months later I am still recovering and learning how to deal with my jpouch.  The past 18 months have been the toughest of my life.  Being so ill and having life changing surgeries have been at times almost too much to bear, there were times when I felt so low, so broken and in so much pain that I just didn’t know how I would cope.

I learnt that coping is the only option.  Every day, no matter how hard it is, you have to just keep plodding, just keep swimming, just keep going… Having fantastic people around you helps and I am lucky enough to have some of the best.  My amazing husband, family and friends make it all bearable in those dark moments and I can’t thank them enough.

This year has seen So Bad Ass turn from a small personal blog into something that is read all over the world and (hopefully) helps people.  All I ever wanted from this blog is to make a difference to other people, to use my pain and my journey to help other people with IBD, to use it to raise awareness, raise money for Crohns and Colitis UK and to help people everywhere to have better self esteem, body confidence and to love themselves.

You are all amazing and I thank you from the bottom of my heart for every read, every like, every tweet, every share, every kind word.  You are awesome!

Enjoy and I will see you in 2015!

 

xx

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Thanks again for an amazing year, if you fancy doing something wonderful please go to my Just Giving page and give whatever you can to Crohns and Colitis UK.

 

Have an amazing christmas and a brilliant New Year!

 

See you in 2015

 

Sam xxx

Dehydration and ileostomies

I was warned when I was in hospital that dehydration is a massive problem for folk with ostomies and pouches, this is because your large intestine absorbs water from your food and a lot of the salt your body needs so if you don’t have a large intestine, you are in for a bit of trouble.

This means that I am always thirsty and drink litres and litres of fruit squash a day, I find water goes through my system too quickly and was advised by a doctor to try adding dilute squash to it as the body has to digest it and so hangs on to the fluids for that little bit longer.  I keep a store of squash in my ensuite bathroom as I drink two or three pints just through the night and so it stops me having to go downstairs at 2am.

Ostomy Lifestyle recommend this…

“People with ileostomies, particularly if the stoma is formed higher up in the bowel, can have more difficulties with their fluid intake. This is because it is the role of the large bowel to absorb water (and salt) and for people with ileostomies this is no longer being used. The small bowel will, with time, adapt to absorb more water and more salt, however careful attention should be paid to ensure that you are drinking an adequate, varied fluid intake (e.g. water, juice, cordial, herbal/fruit teas, etc) to maintain kidney health. Remember, you are aiming for light straw coloured urine.

For those who are more active it is even more important to pay attention to your fluid intake. Fluids lost through sweating contain electrolytes, so it is important to replace those with specialist sports drinks. 

Everyone should bear in mind that alcohol is a dehydrating fluid in the most part and caffeinated drinks such as tea and coffee cause you to lose more fluid in your urine. The majority of your fluid intake should therefore be from fluids such as water and fruit cordials.”

The other issue is salt.  As you don’t absorb salt well it is recommended to increase your salt intake at least for a while after surgery.  I find I crave salt and add it to pretty much everything since having my bowel removed.  I am a big believer that if you are craving something, it tends to be because your body needs it.

“Salt is important for nerve and muscle function and is found naturally in most food and drink. There are risks associated with both having too much and too little salt in our diets. Too much salt can lead to high blood pressure, which can make you more likely to develop heart disease, or have a stroke, while too little salt can cause headaches, cramps and fatigue. While there is some evidence that people with ileostomies can lose between 35-90mmol of sodium per day (equivalent to up to a teaspoon of table salt) because this would normally be absorbed in the large intestine, each person with an ileostomy will differ in terms of the amount they lose. There is also evidence that the small bowel of someone who has an ileostomy adapts over time to compensate for absorption issues. But, in the first few weeks after surgery you may need to add salt to your food and have additional salty snacks. There is conflicting information about long-term addition of salt to diet but evidence shows that most people have adequate salt in their diet to make up for what is lost through their ileostomy and there is no need to add more.”

Stomawise says…

“It is important to know the signs and symptoms of dehydration as well as preventative measures.  These symptoms can include thirst, dry tenting skin, abdominal cramps, rapid heart rate, confusion and low blood pressure.

Dehydration can occur after ileostomy surgery as the purpose of the large intestine is to absorb water from the indigestible waste and then expel the waste material from the body through bowel movements.

During ileostomy surgery, a part or all of the large intestines is removed, which prevents the body from absorbing water from the waste before it is excreted from the body. Dehydration can occur when the person does not drink enough fluids to replace the fluids lost as the waste moves through the stoma and into the attached bag.

Your Daily intake of fluids should be 8-10 (8 oz.) glasses per day and can be of any liquid containing water (soda, milk, juice, etc.) to help meet your daily requirement.

Dehydration can also upset your electrolyte balance (especially potassium and sodium) When the colon (large intestine) is removed, there is a  greater risk for electrolyte imbalance, Diarrhoea, excessive perspiration and vomiting can also increase this risk.

You should be aware of the signs and symptoms of dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration and electrolyte imbalance is more common with an ileostomy as opposed to a colostomy.

Dehydration
Increased thirst, dry mouth, dry skin, decreased urine output, fatigue, shortness of breath, stomach cramps.

Sodium Loss
Loss of appetite, drowsiness and leg cramping may indicate sodium depletion.

Potassium Loss
Fatigue, muscle weakness, shortness of breath, decreased sensation in arms and legs, and a gassy bloated feeling may indicate potassium depletion.”

I am researching Himalayan Pink Salt at the minute for a future blog post, I’m not sure what I think yet but will write about it asap!

These are issues that most people don’t even think about, I thought I would bring it up as I recently spoke to two different people who highlighted to me that there are so many other issues and side effects to having Inflammatory Bowel Disease, a stoma or a pouch that people just do not know about and so thought I would share.

So next time you see an IBDer downing a pint in one or having an extra shake of the salt, you may just understand a little more.  And if you have a stoma or jpouch, take note and keep an eye on your hydration as the effects can be grim and we don’t need any other reason to feel crap!

 

Love Sam xx